The Owlets are out

We joined the mosquitoes for a walk in the arboretum this morning – primarily to monitor the Bobolinks but also to see what was around.

The first thing that was around was at the Great Horned Owl nest where the parent bird was sitting on a branch about ten feet to the side of the nest while the young owlet was peeking over the edge checking us out. neither adult nor young seemed to be in the least worried buy our presence so we had plenty of time to enjoy them. Several people had commented previously that if there were any young they would have left the next by now and that the brood had probably failed … but we were proved right in our interpretation of the adults’ behaviour and now we have seen the little guy.

Great Horned Owl
Great Horned Owl
Mum, or is it dad (?), looks us over and decides we are not a problem
Mum, or is it dad (?), looks us over and decides we are not a problem. Good thing, when you look at those claws and the beak – this is a big bird if it takes a dislike to you.
Great Horned Owl chick checks us out from on high
Great Horned Owl chick checks us out from on high

Normally, that would be more than enough excitement for the day but we wandered down towards the Bobolink fields. as we approached we could hear their bubbling call and we found three males and two females in the southern field and two males in the northern one. It seems that they are not ranging as far across the field as they were last week and we are assuming for now that this means they have chosen their ground nest sites and are keeping an eye on them. They really are a long way away across the field from where we enter it and at the moment we do not want to get too close and risk disturbing them – nevertheless, despite distance and heat haze, we did get a sort of adequate record shot. All photographs today were digiscoped  (http://sparroworks.ca/wildlifing/?page_id=65)

Distant Bobolink
Distant Bobolink

The remaining pictures are just some nice birds – I had hoped for shots of Indigo Bunting as well as these but they have a really sensitive ‘optical lock’ mechanism and managed to move just as I was focussing on them every time. C’est la vie.

We enjoyed a couple of Chestnut-sided Warblers, two Eastern Phoebes at the quarry and an overflying Northern Harrier.

Song Sparrow
Song Sparrow
Common Yellowthroat
Common Yellowthroat
Common Yellowthroat
Common Yellowthroat
Sunlight through the maple trees
Sunlight through the maple trees

 

 

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