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A mixed day

A mixed day

Male and female Purple Martins

Male and female Purple Martins

Male and female Purple Martins

Male and female Purple Martins

Rather distant Northern Harrier crossing the lake towards Dowker Island

Rather distant Northern Harrier crossing the lake towards Dowker Island

Today was planned to be devoted to gardening and making bread … until at just before 9am my friend called me to enjoy a Cape May Warbler (#69) bathing in the waterfall before flying up to the overhanging maple tree to dry off. Not quick enough with the camera – again – but a lovely little bird with its bright orange cheek patches. I wondered if it might not be a lifer, certainly not a common bird for me, but it was first seen here on 3 September 2006; nevertheless a scarce and welcome little bird for all that.

Just over an hour later the garden added (seen by J … still awaited by R) a Ruby-throated Hummingbird … so summer really is imminent it would seem. Hovered briefly in the dogwoods flashing its very bright ruby throat. Later yet while enjoying a beer with lunch on the deck we were serenaded by a Yellow Warbler (#72) in the birch tree “singing station” that all the birds use. late afternoon the wind became extremely gusty and a Nashville Warbler plus a Yellow-rumped Warbler (seen only by J so not listable) made a brief appearance and then a Bay-breasted Warbler worked his way through the maple tree and the redwood before continuing northwards.

A short trip to the weather radar dome to try to digiscope some Cliff Swallows was fruitless as they were all out over the fields and a nearby pond gathering food and nowhere near the nest site. On the way back, I swung round by the town hall boat ramp where there are a couple of drunkenly leaning houses for Purple Martins. None to be seen by the houses but three were wheeling up in the sky over the bay … so, Purple Martin (#71). Going back an hour later PUMAs were sitting on the balconies of the two houses, two males and female being seen. Also seen by the water was a distant raptor crossing the lake towards Dowker Island … I managed to grab a photograph without much hope of identifying it, but on examination the white rump of a Northern Harrier was distinct (#73).

Walking back we were buzzed by a Red-bellied Woodpecker.

 

 

By | 2014-05-11T15:43:47+00:00 May 11th, 2014|birding, Uncategorized|0 Comments

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